Home Community Changes Along Rainier Avenue

Changes Along Rainier Avenue

The JCCCW lower field, being upgraded as a playground. Photos: July 31-Aug 1 (DY).

By David Yamaguchi, The North American Post

Readers driving on Rainier Avenue South will notice two changes on the lots adjoining the Japanese Cultural and Community Center of Washington. The first is that the West Coast Printing building, on the block south of JCCCW, has been demolished and removed to make room for new development. This is good, for the old vacant brick building, with its broken upstairs windows and adjoining overgrown vacant lot, had become an eyesore and a homeless hangout (photo, NAP, “A Moment in Repose,” Mar. 2018). Moreover, with each old, large Seattle brick building like this that comes down or is reinforced, there is one less place that people will likely be killed by falling floors and bricks in the next earthquake.

The former West Coast Printing block.

Additionally, new fencing and playground equipment are being installed in the empty JCCCW lot on the northeast corner of Rainier and South Weller. As described by the informational banner, it is because Bright Water Waldorf, a small, K-8 school that was founded in 1998, has started renting from JCCCW (brightwaterwaldorf.org). The rental seems a good fit because “The J” has had underutilized school buildings and grounds. The income will be useful and the more invested eyes onsite will provide added security. Moreover, the buildings themselves would appreciate the lively chatter of weekday student voices to their classrooms and hallways. The walls have not heard such voices since the era of “Nisei Daughter” (~1920-1941).

The newly relocated school will welcome students to its new campus in September. Please help its students, parents, and staff feel at home.

Previous articleKODA Condominiums Open in Nihonmachi
Next articleQuiet Warriors George Koshi
David Yamaguchi is a third-generation Japanese American [Sansei]. He has written for the Post since 2006, at first as a volunteer, later as a paid freelancer. He joined the paper's staff in May 2020, when he began learning how articles flow from Word files through layout to social media.