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Corporate Information

Corporate Name             North American Post Publishing Inc.

Address                         519 6th Ave. S. #200, Seattle, WA 98104

Tel                                (206) 519 – 5469

Fax                               (419) 730 – 8649

President                       Tomio Moriguchi

Founded                        1902

History

North American Post publishing is one of the oldest minority-owned publishing company in the Greater Seattle area. The company was founded in 1902 by Kiyoshi Kumamoto and investors, who were first generation Japanese immigrants (Issei) in the area. Hokubei Jiji (The North American Times) was launched on September 1, 1902, as the country’s third Japanese- American newspaper.  The paper’s headquarter was located in what is today’s Nihonmachi. At the time of its launch, the paper had six pages, which would become eight by 1905. For the New Year’s edition of the following year, the paper expanded to 32 pages, with a circulation of 5,000 copies.

In 1913, the Arima family, which was central to the paper’s publication, took over management. The paper now had correspondents in Portland, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Spokane, Vancouver and Tokyo, running 6,000 copies. It also added English sections in 1918 and from then on continued enjoying a great print run.

After the WWII began, the paper was discontinued on March 14, 1942. The newspaper published 12,278 issues over 39-and-a-half years at the center of Japanese-American immigrant communities during turbulent times.

The compulsory expulsion of Nikkei during World War II had all but wiped out the Japanese American presence in Japantown. After the war, as people were released from the camps, they restarted their lives. Japanese-language media started to appear, and in June 1946, a publication that continues today, Hokubei Hochi (The North American Post), was published by Hochi Shinbun. The editor in chief was the same person who published Hokubei Jiji before the war, Sumio Arima. The publisher was the former editor of the Takoma Jijo, Sadahiko Ikoma.

During the 1970s, the Issei readers began to grow old, and the paper reduced its print runs. Rising postal rates also squeezed the business. The business faced the possibility of going out of business, but strong support from the community saved it from that fate. In 1974, it received donations from supporting organizations, and in 1981, it stopped publishing for three months, prompting the formation of the North American Post Publishing Inc. by a group of supporting Nikkei organizations to ensure the paper could continue publishing. Tomio Moriguchi, then CEO of Uwajimaya, was one of the supporting members. In 1988, he became a sole owner as publisher of the North American Post and has been supporting the historic community newspaper among Japanese community in the Seattle area.

For more stories behind our history, please read our articles;

Hokubei Jiji The Pillar of Early Japanese Immigrants

Hoji Shimbun Reincarnates as Hokubei Hochi after the War ~NAP History

In 1960, the Crown Prince and Princess (today’s Emperor and Empress) visited Seattle. The North American Post reported in its October 5 edition that 1,000 people went to the airport to greet them.

About Tomio Moriguchi

Tomio has a long history of leadership in the Seattle community and has won numerous awards and recognition for his business leadersihp and extensive volunteer involvement in civic and charitable affairs. He joined the family business, Uwajimaya, Inc., in 1962 after the passing of his father, Fujimatsu Moriguchi, and is currently Chairman of the Board. Tomio led the successful real estate development of Fujisada Condominiums and Uwajimaya Village complex in Seattle’s International District.

Our Publications

The North American Post (www.napost.com)

The North American Post is a community newspaper that celebrates Japanese culture in the Greater Seattle area. Founded by 1st generation Japanese-Americans in 1902, the publication is one of the oldest minority-owned newspapers in the region. Today, with bilingual articles in English and Japanese, the publication connects readers with diverse cultural backgrounds to Seattle’s Japanese community. Our articles include local news, event calendars, restaurant reviews, Japanese cooking recipes, community interviews, and more.

Founded 1902
Publishing Schedule Every 1st and 3rd Friday of the month
Circulation 15,000 monthly (7,500 per issue)
Potential Readership As high as 50,000 in the Greater Seattle area
Major Distribution

 

Uwajimaya, Daiso, H-mart and other Asian grocery stores/Japanese Restaurants/Bellevue College, UW, and other schools with Japanese programs/medical and dental offices, and Japanese-related local events
Distribution Area
  • Seattle:  45%
  • Eastside (Bellevue, Redmond, Kirkland, etc.):  35%
  • North (Lynnwood, Edmonds, etc.):  10%
  • South (Renton, Kent, Federal Way, etc.):  10%

 

Soy Source (www.soysource.net)

Soy Source is a Japanese language newspaper that celebrates the people and events in the Greater Seattle community. Founded in 1992, Soy Source is the only Japanese publication that is locally-operated in Seattle. Our readers are primarily Japanese natives who have lived in the area for many years and tend to have higher educations and incomes. Through the publication’s semi-monthly paper issues, website, online videos, and SNS pages, Soy Source is the most effective media for reaching the Japanese community in the Seattle area.

Founded 1992
Publishing Schedule Every 2nd and 4th Friday of the month
Circulation 15,000 monthly (7,500 per issue)
Potential Readership As high as 50,000 in the Greater Seattle area
Major Distribution

 

Uwajimaya, Daiso, H-mart and other Asian grocery stores/Japanese Restaurants/Bellevue College, UW, and other schools with Japanese programs/medical and dental offices, and Japanese-related local events
Distribution Area
  • Seattle:  45%
  • Eastside (Bellevue, Redmond, Kirkland, etc.):  35%
  • North (Lynnwood, Edmonds, etc.):  10%
  • South (Renton, Kent, Federal Way, etc.):  10%